Venison Sauerbraten



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1 Marinate the venison: Put marinade ingredients (wine, vinegar, water, peppercorns, juniper, mustard, cloves, bay leaves, thyme, celery, carrots and onion) in a pot and bring to a boil.

Turn off heat and allow the marinade to cool.

Submerge the venison in the marinade and refrigerate for at least 24 hours, and up to 5 days. Three days is a good length of time for this.

When you are ready to cook, remove the roast from the marinade and sprinkle it all over with salt. Set it aside for 15-20 minutes or so.

2 Preheat the oven to 275°F. Actually, 225°F is a better temperature, but the roast can take up to 8 hours to properly cook then; this is what I do at home on weekends. At 275°F, the roast will probably take about 5 hours to cook. You can go up to 300°F – a typical venison roast will be ready in 3 1/2 hours at this temperature – but you will get gray, not pink, meat. It will still taste good, though.

3 Brown venison in butter or oil (optional): Now you have an optional step: You can, if you choose, brown the venison in butter or oil. I chose not to because if you then simmer the venison at a low enough temperature, it will remain pink all the way through. If you brown the outside, you will get a gray ring around the edge of the venison when you cut into it. Either way is fine.

4 Cook the venison in the marinade: Pour the marinade into a Dutch oven or other lidded, oven-proof pot and bring it to a boil. Add the venison to the pot. Cover and put in the oven.

If the venison is not submerged by the marinade, turn the roast over every hour. This is also a good way to test for doneness – you want the roast to almost be falling apart.

The roast should take between 3 1/2 to 8 hours to cook, depending on the oven temperature. At 275°F, it should take about 5 hours to cook.

5 Remove roast from oven and coat with oil or melted butter: When the roast is done (completely tender), take it out of the pot and coat it with some of the 1/4 cup olive oil or melted butter. Reserve the rest of the oil or butter for later. Wrap it in foil.

6 Make the sauerbraten sauce: Sauerbraten is all about the sauce. Strain the cooking liquid through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl.

Take the 8 gingersnap cookies and pulverize them in a blender. You want it to look like a rough meal or coarse flour.

In a medium-sized pot, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat. When it is frothing and totally melted, whisk in 2 tablespoons flour. Cook the roux until it is the color of coffee-and-cream, stirring often.

Slowly whisk in the strained cooking liquid, one cup at a time. The mixture will turn to clay at first, then loosen into a silky sauce.

Taste for salt – it will probably need it – and add enough to your taste.

Whisk in 4 tablespoons of the pulverized gingersnaps. They will not dissolve completely at first, but keep stirring and they will disappear.

Taste the sauce. Add another tablespoon of gingersnaps if you want, or add a tablespoon of sugar.

The sauce should taste sour, warm (a pumpkin pie sort of spicy warm) and a little zippy and sweet.

7 To serve, slice the roast into 1/4 inch thick slices. Venison can be dry – it has zero fat – so one trick I do is to coat each slice in melted butter before I serve it. You’ll need about 1/2 stick melted to do this trick.

Serve with lots of sauce, some braised onions, and either mashed potatoes, egg noodles, or spaetzle. A hearty red wine would be an ideal match here, as would a dark, malty beer.


Oma's Classic German Sauerbraten Recipe

Her recipes are special to me. Full of wonderful memories, especially sitting in the dining room, enjoying these delicious feasts. This amazing beef dinner is one of those. The meat is so tender and flavorful. It's German food at its best!

And, it's so easy to make, especially using a crockpot, aka, a slow cooker.

The slow cooker makes this tender marinated meat ever more tender. It's a traditional German dinner and still is a favorite.

However, if you wish, you can cook it on the stove top instead. Which ever way you choose, you'll be thrilled with the tenderness and the flavor.

There’s something absolutely mouth-watering about having a German meat-and-potato dinner. Get Oma's revised collection of her favorites in German Meat Dishes.

Take a peek at all Oma's eCookbooks. They make sharing your German heritage a delicious adventure!

An authentic German sauerbraten is so easy to make, but it's NOT quick . it takes time to marinate and to cook. It just means that you need to do some planning to allow several days for the marinating to take place. 

But, it's SO good and SO worth the time.


Venison Sauerbraten

Place venison roast in a glass or earthenware bowl or baking dish with onions, bay leaves, peppercorns, berries, cloves, vinegar, boiling water, and salt.

Cover tightly and refrigerate, turning venison twice a day for at least 3 days.

Never pierce the meat when turning.

Remove venison from marinade and reserve the marinade. Cook venison in the shortening in a heavy skillet until brown on all sides.

Add the marinade mixture. Heat to boiling reduce heat. Cover and simmer until venison is tender, 3 to 3½ hrs. (Crockpot on high all day. works)

Remove venison and onions from skillet and keep warm. Strain and measure liquid in skillet.

Add enough water to liquid to measure 3½ cups. Pour liquid into skillet. Cover and simmer 10 minutes. Stir gingersnaps and sugar into liquid. Cover and simmer 3 minutes.

Serve venison with onions and gravy. Baked potatoes and Citrus salad are serve with.


Recipe Summary

  • 3 pounds beef rump roast
  • 2 large onions, chopped
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar, or to taste
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 10 whole cloves, or more to taste
  • 2 bay leaves, or more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 10 gingersnap cookies, crumbled

Place beef rump roast, onions, vinegar, water, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 tablespoon black pepper, sugar, cloves, and bay leaves in a large pot. Cover and refrigerate for 2 to 3 days, turning meat daily. Remove meat from marinade and pat dry with paper towels, reserving marinade.

Season flour to taste with salt and black pepper in a large bowl. Sprinkle flour mixture over beef.

Heat vegetable oil in a large Dutch oven or pot over medium heat cook beef until brown on all sides, about 10 minutes. Pour reserved marinade over beef, cover, and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer until beef is tender, 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Remove beef to a platter and slice.

Strain solids from remaining liquid and continue cooking over medium heat. Add gingersnap cookies and simmer until gravy is thickened about 10 minutes. Serve gravy over sliced beef.

Aluminum foil helps keep food moist, ensures it cooks evenly, keeps leftovers fresh, and makes clean-up easy.


Venison Sauerbraten

1. Place the venison in a large mixing bowl together with the onions, bay leaves, tightly and refrigerate, turning venison twice a day for at least 2 days. Never pierce the meat when turning.

2. Remove the venison from the bowl and reserve the marinade.

3. Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the venison and brown on all sides.

4. Add the marinade , bring to the boil then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 3 to 3-1/2 hrs until tender. Can also be cooked in a slow cooker or crockpot on high for 8 hours.

5. Remove the venison and onions from the pan and keep warm.

6. Strain the cooking liquor into a measuring jug and make up to 600ml/1pt with extra water.

7. Pour the liquid into a saucepan, bring to the boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

8. Stir in the crushed ginger nuts and sugar then cover and simmer for a further 3 minutes.

9. To serve - slice the venison and place on a warmed serving platter. Garnish with the onions and drizzle a little of the gravy over the top. Serve the remaining gravy separately.


Venison Sauerbraten

1 Bring marinade ingredients — wine, vinegar, water, peppercorns, juniper, mustard, cloves, bay leaves, thyme, celery, carrots and onion — to a boil and turn off the heat. Allow to cool. Submerge the venison in the marinade and let it sit in the fridge for at least 24 hours, and up to 5 days. Three days is a good length of time. When you are ready to cook, take the roast out of the marinade and salt it well. Set it aside for 15-20 minutes or so.

2 Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Actually, 225 is a better temperature, but the roast can take up to 8 hours to properly cook then this is what I do at home on weekends. At 275 degrees, the roast will probably take about 5 hours to cook. You can go up to 300 degrees – a typical venison roast will be ready in 3 1/2 hours at this temperature – but you will get gray, not pink, meat. It will still taste good, though.

3 Now you have an optional step: You can, if you choose, brown the venison in butter or oil. I chose not to because if you then simmer the venison at a low enough temperature, it will remain pink all the way through. If you brown the outside, you will get a gray ring around the edge of the venison when you cut into it. Either way is fine.

4 Pour the marinade into a pot and bring it to a boil. Pour it into a Dutch oven or other lidded pot and place the venison inside. Cover and put in the oven. If the venison is not submerged by the marinade, turn the roast over every hour. This is also a good way to test for doneness – you want the roast to almost be falling apart. When the roast is done, take it out of the pot and coat it with some of the 1/4 cup olive oil or melted butter. Reserve the rest of the oil or butter for later. Wrap it in foil.

5 Now you make the sauerbraten sauce – and sauerbraten is all about the sauce. Strain the cooking liquid through a fine-meshed sieve into a bowl. Take the 8 ginger snap cookies and pulverize them in a blender. You want it to look like a rough meal or coarse flour.

6 In a medium-sized pot, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat. When it is frothing and totally melted, whisk in 2 tablespoons flour. Cook until it is the color of coffee-and-cream, stirring often. Slowly whisk in the cooking liquid, one cup at a time. The mixture will turn to clay at first, then loosen into a silky sauce. Taste for salt – it will probably need it – and add enough to your taste.

7 Whisk in 4 tablespoons of the pulverized ginger snaps. They will not dissolve completely at first, but keep stirring and they will disappear. Taste the sauce. Add another tablespoon of ginger snaps if you want, or add a tablespoon of sugar. The sauce should taste sour, warm (a pumpkin pie sort of spicy warm) and a little zippy and sweet.

8 To serve, slice the roast into 1/4 inch thick slices. Venison can be dry – it has zero fat – so one trick I do is to coat each slice in melted butter before I serve it. You’ll need about 1/2 stick melted to do this trick. Serve with lots of sauce, some braised onions, and either mashed potatoes, egg noodles, or spaetzle.


Venison Sauerbraten

Place venison roast in a glass or earthenware bowl or baking dish with
onions, bay leaves, peppercorns, berries, cloves, vinegar, boiling water,
and salt. Cover tightly and refrigerate, turning venison twice a day for at
least 3 days. Never pierce the meat when turning.

Remove venison from marinade and reserve the marinade. Cook venison in the
shortening in a heavy skillet until brown on all sides. Add the marinade
mixture. Heat to boiling reduce heat. Cover and simmer until venison is
tender, 3 to 3 1/2 hrs. (Crockpot on high all day. works) Remove
venison and onions from skillet and keep warm.

Strain and measure liquid in skillet. Add enough water to liquid to
measure 2 1/2 cups. Pour liquid into skillet. Cover and simmer 10 minutes.
Stir gingersnaps and sugar into liquid. Cover and simmer 3 minutes. Serve
venison with onions and gravy. Baked potatoes and Citrus salad are serve
withs.


Stephanie Henkel (author) from USA on December 01, 2011:

Hi Thelma, It sounds like you have some good memories of your mother-in-law&aposs cooking! German Sauerbraten is one of my family&aposs favorite dishes, partly because it tastes so good and partly because it brings back good memories of family gatherings. Thanks for stopping in to share your memories of a good cook!

Thelma Alberts from Germany and Philippines on December 01, 2011:

Hello Stephanie. I love Sauerbraten. It is one of my favorites. I know it is very delicious. Sauerbraten reminds me of my dead mother-in-law who was a very good cook. She always cooked well for her family. Blessed her.

Stephanie Henkel (author) from USA on November 30, 2011:

Sally&aposs Trove - I&aposm sorry your last sauerbraten was such a disappointment! I guess I wouldn&apost have tried to pick pieces of light bulb out of my food, either. But I think you&aposll find this method of making sauerbraten in your pressure cooker easy and tasty. I hope you get to try it soon!

Sherri from Southeastern Pennsylvania on November 30, 2011:

I&aposm so glad you posted this to fb today! It&aposs a reminder that I should make sauerbraten one of these cold winter days soon. I haven&apost made it in years and years, and the reason is kind of sad. The last time I made it, I pulled it out of the oven at the end, put it on the stove top, removed the lid, and, just like THAT, the lightbulb in the stove&aposs vent hood blew out and shattered all over the roast. I&aposm taking your hub as a good omen for making this wonderful dish again!

Stephanie Henkel (author) from USA on December 06, 2010:

Actually, my husband usually makes the sauerbraten, too. He loves it, and since we often make it from venison that he brings home from the hunt, he likes to do the cooking. But we all enjoy it!

Gail Sobotkin from South Carolina on December 06, 2010:

Will share this recipe with my husband who does most all the cooking in our house (lucky me). We&aposre not of German descent but he loves sauerbraten!


HERE IS WHAT WIKIPEDIA SAYS ABOUT SAUERBRATEN:

Sauerbraten (German: “sour roast” from sauer for “sour” or “pickled” and Braten for “roast meat”) is a German pot roast that can be prepared with a variety of meats—most often beef, but also from venison, lamb, mutton, pork, and traditionally, horse. Before cooking, the cut of meat is marinated for several days (recipes vary from three to ten days) in a mixture of vinegar or wine, water, herbs, spices, and seasonings. Since usually tougher cuts of meat (like rump roast, or bottom round of beef) are used for Sauerbraten, the longer marinating of the meat acts to tenderize it, resulting in a finished dish that is tender, soft, and juicy. The ingredients of the marinade vary based on regional styles and traditions throughout Germany.

This recipe isn’t for the faint of heart. It takes 3 days to prepare and a good afternoon or morning in the kitchen. BUT the meal is so worth the time and effort to make! If you make this recipe I would love for you to let me know how you think it tasted.


Sauerbraten – Canning meat in vinegar for a great stew!

One of my new friends, Ginny, who came into my life through canning and gardening was ready to take on the work of pressure canning meats. One of the recipes that she loves is the german favorite, Sauerbraten. Our collaborative thoughts were not whether the meat could be pressure canned in the vinegar, but whether the flavor would be just as good when final preparation of this stew was put together.
Over a Sunday we canned together the meat, vinegar, and spices and processed the meat based on pressure canning processes for beef stew which uses similar carrot and onions.

Now I have not had the stew before but I tasted the vinegar mixture it was a good blend of the cider and red wine and I felt with some time on the shelf with the meat that this would be a great addition to anyone’s pantry.

About six days after doing the meat, Ginny opened one of the jars and completed the recipe and said though the vinegar was a bit strong since we didn’t wait very long but the flavor was incredible and the meat was tender and juicy. Enjoy!


Watch the video: #117 - Oberpfälzer Sauerbraten aus dem Dutch Oven (August 2022).