Shrimp Olivier

Kachka chef Bonnie Morales insists it’s not a Russian party without this retro seafood salad on the table.

Ingredients

  • 4 large Yukon Gold potatoes (about 1¾ lb.), peeled, cut into ¼” pieces
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled, cut into ¼” pieces
  • ¼ cup fresh peas (from about ¼ lb. pods) or frozen peas, thawed
  • 1 pound peeled rock shrimp or bay shrimp
  • ¼ pound medium shrimp, peeled, deveined
  • 4 hard-boiled large eggs, finely chopped
  • 4 Israeli-style pickles or 2 kosher dill pickles, cut into ¼” pieces
  • 1 small sweet onion (such as Vidalia), finely chopped
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped fresh dill, plus sprigs for serving

Recipe Preparation

  • Cook potatoes in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender, 6–8 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon; let cool.

  • Meanwhile, return water to a boil and cook carrots until tender, about 3 minutes; let cool in a colander set in a bowl of ice water. Drain, pat dry, and transfer to a large bowl. Repeat with peas, cooking until bright green, about 30 seconds; add to bowl with carrots.

  • Working in 2 batches, repeat (cook, cool, dry) with rock and medium shrimp, boiling until cooked through, about 1 minute for rock shrimp and 2 minutes for medium. Add rock shrimp to bowl with vegetables; place medium shrimp in another bowl.

  • Add potatoes, eggs, pickles, onion, and chopped dill to vegetables; toss well. Mix in Parsley Mayo, adding more to coat if needed. Top with medium shrimp and dill sprigs just before serving.

  • DO AHEAD: Salad (without dill) can be made 3 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

Recipe by Bonnie Morales, Kachka, Portland,

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 240 Fat (g) 6 Saturated Fat (g) 1.5 Cholesterol (mg) 220 Carbohydrates (g) 24 Dietary Fiber (g) 2 Total Sugars (g) 3 Protein (g) 22 Sodium (mg) 400Reviews Section

Chef Jamie Oliver's Shrimp Linguine

Chef Jamie Oliver shares a quick and easy creamy pasta recipe.

Ingredients

  • 5¼ oz dried linguine
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 5½ oz raw peeled jumbo shrimp
  • 4 slices smoked pancetta or bacon
  • 3 tablespoons Italian red wine
  • 1 heaping tablespoon mascarpone cheese
  • 1¾ oz arugula
  • ½ oz Parmesan cheese
  1. Cook the pasta in a pan of boiling salted water according to the package instructions. Meanwhile, peel and finely slice the garlic.
  2. Run your knife down the back of 2 shrimp, so they’ll butterfly as they cook, then finely chop the rest.
  3. Put a large non-stick frying pan on a medium heat. Finely slice the pancetta, sprinkle into the pan with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and fry until lightly golden.
  4. Toss in the garlic and whole shrimp for 2 minutes, then go in with the wine and let it cook away.
  5. Toss through the chopped shrimp and mascarpone for 1 minute, then use tongs to drag the pasta straight into the pan, letting a little starchy cooking water go with it.
  6. Roughly chop the arugula, add most of it to the pan and toss it all together over the heat until you have a silky sauce.
  7. Subtly season to perfection with the Parmesan and black pepper. Serve sprinkled with the remaining arugula and an extra grating of Parmesan, if you like.

Excerpted 7 WAYS by Jamie Oliver. Copyright © 2020 by Jamie Oliver. Reprinted with permission from Flatiron Books. All rights reserved. Photography by Levon Biss.


Shrimp Verdi featuring Affiorato Olive Oil

Bring 6 quarts of salted water to boil in a large pot. In a large sauté pan, add 2-3 tbsp. Affiorato Olive Oil and 6 cloves garlic. Saute garlic until golden on all sides. Do not burn garlic! When garlic is done, remove and set aside. Put several handfuls of escarole in pan and cook until wilted. Continue adding escarole until all the greens are in the pan. Add Salt from Camargue & pepper to taste and continue cooking until the escarole gets a little browned. Set aside. In a small saucepan, add 2 tbsp. Affiorato Olive Oil and 4 cloves of garlic. Cook until garlic is golden on all sides. Remove garlic, let oil rest for a minute and then carefully add the chicken stock. At this point, add the pasta to the boiling water and cook according to package directions. While pasta is cooking, bring chicken stock to a boil and add shrimp. Cook until the shrimp are fully cooked (about 5 minutes, shrimp will be pink and opaque). Take 5 of the cooked garlic cloves and mince through a garlic press into the chicken stock. Add the bag of semi dried tomatoes and stir well. When pasta is done, drain well and add the chicken stock mixture. Toss in the sautéed escarole and place mixture in a large pasta bowl. Drizzle with Affiorato Olive Oil and serve.


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Stacey Snacks

This was one of those dishes that I had a craving for.

I rarely eat potato salad in the winter, but it's truly my favorite indulgence.
I say "indulgence" because really, mayonnaise and potatoes is not what I should eat everyday, and you probably shouldn't either (but who am I to say. ).

I read that this is a staple at Russian parties. and also known in the 1960's as Salad Olivier (named after whom?).
Also known in Italy and Spain as "Insalata Russa" (minus the shrimp, but sometimes has tuna).

Retro or not, it tasted so good in my belly. Take me back to the '60s if this is what they are serving (but no cream cheese in celery please).

The real Russian recipe calls for using a type of bologna instead of shrimp, but I will pass on the beige processed meat products.

I will be making this in the summer (if I remember to) for all of my parties.

Insalata Russa aka Salad Olivier:

1 lb. of small yellow creamer potatoes (skins left on)
1/2 lb. of small cooked shrimp, tails removed
1/2 small white onion, chopped
4 cornichon or sweet dill pickles, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and cut into small dice
1/2 cup of defrosted frozen peas
1/4 cup of fresh dill, chopped
3 tbsp of Hellmann's REAL mayonnaise
salt & pepper
3 hardboiled eggs
handful of chopped parsley

Cook the potatoes in boiling salted water for 20-23 minutes until tender.
Let cool and slice.

Cook shrimp in boiling water for 3 minutes and transfer to an ice bath to stop the cooking.

Do I need to tell you how to hard boil eggs? I do mine for 9 minutes if you must know.

If the shrimp are small, then leave whole, if not, then chop them into pieces.


Contents

The original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, [1] Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow's most celebrated restaurants. Olivier's salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant's signature dish.

The exact recipe—particularly that of the dressing—was a zealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier's sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier's private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier's famed dressing. Ivanov then left Olivier's employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name "metropolitan salad" (Russian: Столичный , tr. Stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the "Stolichny" salad was of a lower quality than Olivier's, meaning that it was "missing something."

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family's subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as "Olivier."

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3–4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 1 ⁄ 2 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

The earliest published recipe known to date appeared in the Russian magazine Наша пища (Nasha pishcha, "Our Cuisine") No. 6 (31 March 1894). This magazine published from 1891 to 1896, editor M. Ignatiev, stated that the original recipe contained "mogul sauce" or "kabul sauce" (along the lines of Worcestershire sauce), manufactured by John Burgess & Son [Note 2] (the brand he reputedly used) and Crosse & Blackwell. [2] Some later recipes substituted soy sauce for the mogul sauce. [3]

The book Руководство к изучению основ кулинарного искусства (Rukovodstvo k izucheniyu osnov kulinarnogo iskusstva, "Guide to the Fundamentals of Culinary Arts") (1897) by P. Aleksandrova gave a recipe containing grouse, crayfish, potatoes, cucumber, lettuce, aspic, capers, olives and mayonnaise. The author wrote that veal, partridge or chicken could be substituted but that the authentic recipe contained grouse. [3]

In post-revolutionary Russia, cheaper ingredients were substituted for the originals: grouse was replaced by chicken or sausage, crayfish by hard-boiled egg, cucumbers, olives and capers by pickled cucumbers and green peas.

Earlier, it always included cold meat such as ham or veal tongue, or fish. The mid-20th century restaurant version involved not just vegetables, but also pickled tongue, sausage, lobster meat, truffles, etc. garnished with capers, anchovy fillets, etc. Some versions mold it in aspic.

In modern usage, it is usually boiled diced vegetables bound in mayonnaise, with Doktorskaya-type sausage. The most common alternative version, where it is replaced with boiled or smoked chicken, is called Stolichny salad, after Ivanov's version.

A multitude of other versions, named, unnamed, and even trademarked exist, but only Olivier and Stolichny salad have entered the common vernacular of post-Soviet states.

Today's popular version of Olivier salad—containing boiled potatoes, dill pickles, peas, eggs, carrots, and boiled beef/chicken or bologna, dressed with mayonnaise—is a version of Ivanov's Stolichny salad, and only faintly resembles Olivier's original creation. This version was a staple of any Soviet holiday dinner, especially of a Novy God (New Year's Eve) dinner (to the extent that its presence was considered on a par with Soviet Champagne or mandarin oranges), due to availability of components in winter. Even though more exotic foods are widely available in Russia now, its popularity has hardly diminished: this salad was and maybe still is the most traditional dish for the home New Year celebration for Russian people. [4]

Festive Russian and post-Soviet states' homemade versions are traditionally up to the cook's whim. While some of the ingredients are considered to be basic and essential, others are either favoured or angrily dismissed as a threat to the supposed authenticity.

The biggest Olivier salad, weighing 1841 kg , was prepared in December 2012 in Orenburg. [5] [6]

European cafes and delis often provide an entire range of Olivier-style salads, ranging from passable to gourmet. Additionally, cafeterias, convenience stores, and truck stops sell a number of sub-par factory packaged or locally made versions, mostly extremely simple, using basic ingredients flooded with an abundance of cheap mayonnaise-like dressing.

Southeast Europe Edit

The salad is widely popular in the Balkans as "russian salad", руска салата (ruska salata) in Bulgaria, Serbia, North Macedonia, and sallatë ruse in Albania. The Bulgarian version of the salad usually consists of potatoes, carrots, peas, pickles and some sort of salami or ham. In Bosnia and Herzegovina both the ruska salata and francuska salata (which is essentially Russian salad prepared without meat) are very popular, especially during holidays.

In Croatia and Slovenia it is typically prepared without meat, and is usually called francuska salata in Croatian and francoska solata in Slovene, both meaning French salad.

The Romanian variant, called salată de boeuf ("beef salad"), is considered a traditional dish. It is a combination of finely chopped beef (or chicken) and root vegetables, folded in mayonnaise and finished with murături, traditional Romanian mixed pickles. It can be made vegetarian, too.

Central Europe Edit

In Czech it is called simply bramborový salát (potato salad). It consists of boiled and cubed vegetables (potatoes, carrots, parsley and celery root), finely chopped onions and pickles in mayo dressing, often with diced hard-boiled eggs, some kind of soft salami or canned green peas. It is the side-dish of choice to go with schnitzel or breaded carp, staple Christmas meals in the Czech Republic.

Polish sałatka jarzynowa or sałatka warzywna ("vegetable salad", often simply called salatka) is always vegetarian, consisting of peas, hard boiled eggs, and the mirepoix, always cut into small cubes, seasoned with mayonnaise, salt, pepper. Recipes usually vary by region (tart apples or pickles can be added) and even by household, sometimes even adding meat (e.g. ham). One such notable exception is szałot (Polish pronunciation: [ˈʂawɔt] ), a Silesian variety which may include not only boiled potatoes, carrots, peas and boiled eggs, but also bacon, sausages or pickled herring. [7] Such salads are often served on family celebrations, in particular on Christmas Eve (Christmas Eve dishes are very different from the food that is served on Christmas Day).

Southern Europe Edit

In Greece It can be found on almost any restaurant's menu and is called ρώσικη σαλάτα (rossiki salata), it usually contains no meat. Ensaladilla rusa ("Russian little salad") is widely consumed in Spain and it is served as a tapa in many bars. It typically consists of minced boiled potato, minced boiled carrots, canned tuna, minced boiled eggs, peas, and mayonnaise. [8] This bears some similarity to versions of macédoine de légumes froid. In Italy, Insalata russa has the same ingredients. A similar version is also popular in Portugal, where it is called salada russa. It is usually served either as a standalone dish or as a garnish to fish dishes, particularly fish fillets.

Northern Europe Edit

In Norway, Iceland and Denmark it is called Italian salad and contains carrots and green peas in mayo dressing. Often and most popular is to pair the salad with smoked meat on bread. In Finland, the Italian salad replaces potatoes with spaghetti.

Asia Edit

Olivier salad (Persian: الويه ‎) is popular in Iran, where it is usually made with potatoes, eggs, Persian pickled cucumbers, carrots, chicken, peas and mayonnaise, and is frequently had as a sandwich filler. [9]

In Turkey it is known as Rus salatası ("Russian Salad"). The Turkish version consists of boiled and sliced carrots and potatoes, sliced cucumber pickles, boiled peas and mayonnaise and is sometimes decorated with boiled and sliced eggs, black olives and beet root pickles. It is served as meze and is used as a filling for some sandwiches and kumpir (jacket potato). Another Turkish name for Olivier salad is Amerikan salatası ("American salad"), a euphemistic misnomer originating from the Cold War period.

It is a popular salad in Pakistan and India as well, where it is usually made with potatoes, peas, apples (and/or pineapples) and mayonnaise and is frequently used as a side dish in cafes. Another version of Russian salad is also very popular in Pakistan which bears no resemblance to Olivier salad and instead is a cabbage and apple slaw.

Olivier salad is believed to be introduced as a "Capital salad" or "Niislel salad" in Mongolia during the Soviet period. It usually consists of minced ham and carrots, minced boiled eggs, minced boiled carrots and potatoes dressed with mayonnaise. It is widely popular amongst Mongolians, especially during the festive seasons.

Latin America Edit

The dish is also very popular in Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Ecuador, Peru, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia and the Dominican Republic where it is called ensalada rusa and has been reduced to its minimum: minced boiled potatoes and carrots, green beans and abundant mayonnaise-based dressing. In Argentina it is usually served on its own as a first course, or with a very thinly sliced beef wrapping called matambre, in a dish called matambre con rusa. Argentinians of Eastern European Jewish origin may make the salad with tuna. In Colombia and Venezuela it is a traditional Christmas sidedish. In Haiti, “salad russe” is made of diced boiled vegetables including beets, carrots, potatoes and sometimes corn, mixed with mayonnaise and spices. It is often served as a side dish.


Classic Creole Entrees

These dishes represent five generations of Creole tradition, beginning with the woman known in the family as Gramma Gaudet. Her recipes were passed on to her daughter-in-law, Mamma Jeanne (Gaudet) Doublet and then down to Audrey (La France) Gaudet and finally to Cheryl (Gaudet) Olivier, Chef Armand's mother. We have divided the menu according to which member inspired each dish.

Creole Rabbit

Rabbit was a staple of the 19th century New Orleans table. There are several Creole versions of this specialty. Ours begins by braising the seasoned rabbit, then simmering it in a delicious gravy to keep the meat moist. Cooked until tender to the fork, served with a rich oyster dressing seasoned with sage. This dish came from the country to the city more than a century ago. Few restaurants serve rabbit now, but it is Papa Armand's favorite Sunday dinner, so we keep up the tradition.


A Foodpairing® Remix

When looked at the Foodpairing tree of boiled potato, you’ll easily find all the ingredients that are used for the modern Salad Olivier. We used the same base recipe to create some Foodpairing twists and remixes.

Foodpairing Tree

A first variation we’ve created is the base recipe with some fruit twists added to it. Use the category filters to find fitting fruits. We’ve chosen grapefruit.


Soups

Get a taste of these hearty soups from all over the world.

Ertesuppe (Split Pea Soup)

Beloved across the Twin Cities region of Minnesota, split pea soup is actually one of Norway’s many culinary imports.

Wisconsin Beer Cheese Soup

Wisconsin, home of so many cheeses, is the inspiration for this hearty soup that highlights bock beer and two kinds of cheddar, with its traditional garnish of popcorn and chives.

French Onion Soup

This classic soup can be simply outstanding when made with a hearty homemade beef stock or broth, but in a pinch, purchased broth will still make a very good soup.

Cream of Chanterelle Soup with Arugula

The chanterelle, or the girolle as it is called in France, is a gold, spongy, trumpet-shaped mushroom with a distinctly nutty flavor. Chanterelles have a short growing season.

Pumpkin Soup

Since the first pumpkin seeds were brought to the Old World from the Americas, Europe has embraced squash-based cuisine. This easy recipe yields a full-bodied soup without using cream.

Carbonnade à la Flamande

Winter is the perfect time to make hearty meals that raise everyone’s spirits. Unlike French stews made with wine, this Flemish carbonnade relies on the flavor of Belgian abbey-style beer.

Bouillabaisse Toulonnaise

Originally cooked by fishermen using unwanted fish from their catch, this traditional Provençal fish stew is served with a creamy, saffron-scented rouille.

Roasted Pumpkin Soup

The sugar pumpkin called for in this recipe is a cooking variety dense with meat, tender and perfect for cooking and baking, it is an excellent source of vitamin A.

Creamy Tomato Soup with Truffle Oil

Warm and rich, this soup can be made in under half an hour for quick, delicious comfort food, and the dash of savory truffle oil adds a decidedly European touch.

Dutch Cheese Soup

The Dutch are great soup eaters, often featuring soup as a main dish. This hearty soup, enriched with Gouda cheese, is perfect served piping hot on a chilly evening.

Hungarian Goulash

Goulash originated with Hungary’s herdsmen and quickly spread throughout Europe. It is a soup, but its rich combination of ingredients makes it a meal on its own.

Česnečka

According to Czech lore, Česnečka (garlic soup) will cure just about anything, even the common cold. It certainly tastes rich and comforting.

Russian Borscht

This beet soup is a staple of Russia and eastern Europe. Thought to have originated in Ukraine, its name is derived from Yiddish.

Beef Pho

Pho (pronounced like “fun” without the “n”) originated in northern Vietnam during the early 20th century, and was likely brought by Chinese refugees who settled around Hanoi at that time.

Ciorba de Varza

Ciorba de Varza (pronounced “CHOR ba duh VAR zuh”) is a traditional cabbage soup with meatballs, very typical of the Bulgaria/Romania region, and uses both fresh and fermented cabbage (sauerkraut).

Dutch Split Pea Soup

Healthy, hearty and packed with flavor, this Dutch version of split pea soup (known as snert), is one of the signature dishes of the Netherlands.

Linseneintopf (German Lentil and Sausage Stew)

The literal translation is “lentil pot” (linsen + eintopf), but the recipe results are magic. Chock-full of sausage, bacon and veggies, this hearty stew is a welcome winter meal.

Roasted Carrot Soup

The nutty, spicy seasoning of this hearty soup combined with yogurt topping gives it a unique and irresistible flavor. Made with toasted and grinded nuts and seeds, peeled carrots and chicken stock, it is easy to prepare.


SUGGESTED USES FOR OUR BOTTLES

Salad Dressing, Pasta Dressing, Marinade and Dipper. Great for Sandwiches.
Use for Grilling Vegetables.

Basil, Garlic & Parmesan Oil - Our #1 Bottle!

Dressing for Salads and Pasta. Excellent on Fish, Our #1 Bread Dipper!

Raspberry Balsamic Vinegar

Salad Dressing. Used for sauces on all types of meat. Outstanding on Fruits and
Ice Cream.

Blackberry Balsamic Vinegar

Salad Dressing. Drizzle on Pork Chops and Roasts. Use on Ice Cream.

Traditional Barrel-Aged Balsamic Vinegar

Use on your favorite Salad Greens.

Fig Balsamic Vinegar

Salad Dressing. Use on Strawberries, Blueberries, Cantaloupe, Pork Roasts. Our Favorite: Spinach Salad with Feta Cheese, Pine Nuts, Grape Tomatoes, Blackberries.

Asian with Sesame and Ginger Oil

Perfect for Stir Fried and Mixed Vegetables. Use on Pasta, Chicken, Fish and Shrimp.
So Delicious on Salmon, we want to rename the bottle Seafood Sensation !! We know you'll agree.

White Truffle Oil

Drizzle over Pasta, Risotto & Potatoes. Amazing for Pan Roasted Vegetables,
Mashed Potatoes and Popcorn.

Jalapeno Oil

A Pick-Me-Up Salad Dressing. Drizzle on Roasted Vegetables, Tacos and
Red Spaghetti Sauce.

Meyer Lemon Oil

Use on Any Salad, Fish or Vegetables. Our favorite: Orzo, Fresh Chopped Spinach, Feta Cheese, toss while warm.


Olivier Salad: History and Cooking Secrets

Olivier, a festive, traditional New Year’s Eve salad, is one of the most popular salads of Russian cuisine.

In the 1860’s at a French restaurant called Hermitage in Moscow, there worked a cook, Laurence Olivier. He invented the salad, which later became a classic in the countries of the former USSR. Among the ingredients were: hazel grouses, veal tongue, stew caviar, pickles, capers, eggs, fresh lettuce, and a mayonnaise-sauce served as a dressing. However, the salad recipe was kept in the strictest secrecy: no matter how hard gourmets tried to determine what exactly the French chef added to the salad, their attempts were unsuccessful.

The first mention of Olivier salad refers to 1894, and in 1897, the salad recipe was published in the book, A Guide to the Study of the Foundations of Culinary Arts. It is believed that this recipe was greatly simplified: there was no longer any tongue or caviar in it, and potatoes were added.

Salad Olivier experienced a new birth under the Soviet regime. The salad dressing has undergone significant changes as the hazel grouses, caviar, tongue, capers, and even lettuce have disappeared. Now, the salad was made from potatoes, green peas, boiled eggs, pickled cucumbers, and boiled chicken meat with mayonnaise dressing. Sometimes, boiled carrots were added to the salad. Over time, instead of boiled meat people began to use cooked “Doctor” sausage, and a salad with chicken meat was called “Stolichny” (Moscow salad). All the ingredients were cut into cubes and dressed with mayonnaise.

Since Olivier salad products were available not only in the season of fresh vegetables and fruits, but also in winter, the salad was given the same name as the cold season.

Over time, it became very popular, and people loved to cook it for the New Year. It so happened that along with the “herring under the fur coat,” the Olivier salad became one of the main festive dishes.

A Million Recipes

Probably, every Soviet hostess had her own recipe for Olivier. Some added only pickled cucumbers, some preferred salted, and others used fresh lettuce. Some added finely chopped fresh lettuce or salted tomatoes others put an apple (usually “Antonovka”), and some decorated the dish with cranberry berries.

Perhaps the key components of Olivier are only eggs, potatoes, green peas, and mayonnaise the rest of the ingredients can vary indefinitely. It is interesting that this composition, which is now recognized as classical, has little in common with the original recipe. However, it is in this form that the Olivier salad became important to millions of people, and therefore, attempts to recreate the original recipe have not been successful.

There are so many varieties of salad that it is almost impossible to determine at what point the salad loses its right to the original name and becomes a new dish. If desired, you can find salad recipes with fruits and nuts, lamb and pork, or a smoked sausage and duck. Moreover, there is even a recipe for Olivier without mayonnaise.

The most common salad Olivier is with sausage. Sausage should be boiled, without fat, and have a delicate taste. If desired, you can replace it with ham. It is also possible to replace it with baked, boiled or fried beef and chicken. Some even make Olivier with fish, shrimp, or squid although such variations are tasty, they can hardly be called a meat salad.

The charm of Olivier salad is in combined tastes. Potatoes, eggs, and peas are fairly neutral salted cucumbers make a piquant sourness carrots add sweetness and sausage completes the composition with a salty taste. In general, the salad has a mild taste, without excessive sharpness. While improvising, do not break this harmony, but you can complement the salad with other flavors. For example, sweet and sour apple, gentle celery, brackish mushrooms, or spicy cheese. Beans, beets, asparagus, olives, and bell peppers are also added sometimes.

Cooks all over the world do not get tired of arguing about onion and whether its sharp taste is pertinent in a salad Olivier. Many believe that it is better to prepare the salad without onions, others add green or very finely chopped onions, while others tend to compromise: onion, scalded with boiling water and therefore not acute, but only sweet.

The Secrets of Cooking

First of all, all the ingredients must be cooled. Eggs, meat, potatoes and carrots are recommended to boil beforehand so that they can cool completely.

Secondly, the components of the salad should be cut as small as possible. Of course, such cutting takes time, but the salad becomes very gentle: the tastes intertwine, creating gastronomic harmony.

Thirdly, only high-quality mayonnaise should be used for dressing. Do not save on sauce. It is best to prepare mayonnaise on your own or buy a ready-made sauce from a trusted producer. The composition of the sauce should be egg yolks and vegetable (preferably olive) oil. Lenten and “light” varieties of mayonnaise will not work—attempts to make a diet dish from Olivier will not be successful, and the taste will suffer.

As you can see, there is nothing extremely hard in making the Olivier salad, but its charm is in its simplicity. Your family will enjoy this salad!


Watch the video: Γαρίδες λεμονάτες (December 2021).