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Worst Food Sex Tips Slideshow

Worst Food Sex Tips Slideshow

Tool: A wooden spoon

Advice: Use a wooden spoon to "give him a light smack on his butt."

Problems:
Don’t wooden spoons harbor bacteria? Also, how will you tell your guests that the spoon you’re using to stir their butternut squash soup was also used for sexual foreplay?

Tool: Warheads

Advice: "Tired of chocolate and whipped cream? You can also tickle each other's erogenous zones with ice cubes and sour and sweet candy like Warheads." Cosmo also suggests using the Warheads in a "find the sour spot on my body" game.

Problems: Have you seen people eat Warheads? Do you find those pinched, pained faces sexy? Not sure this is something you want to see in bed.

Tool: Fruit

Advice: "Chew a small piece of mango" and proceed with the bedroom activities. "You can use whatever fruit you have, just don't try anything too acidic, as it can burn him," Cosmopolitan warns.

Problems: Wait, is this a texture thing? A flavor thing? We just don't get it. Also, so many things can go wrong if you decide to do something in-between, like strawberries. Mildly acidic, possibly painful. You never know until you try.

Tools: Whipped Cream, Honey, Chocolate, Peanut Butter

Advice: "Take a few of your favorite erotically appealing flavor combinations, like peanut butter and honey or whipped cream and chocolate sauce, and mix up yummy treats all over his body."

Problems: Every girl has read this, watched that Varsity Blues clip of teenage boys' dreams, and thought, "Gross!" Because as much as whipped cream, chocolate, honey, and peanut butter sound amazing on ice cream and cookies, sticky fingers and other body parts sound less than appealing. And getting chocolate sauce on your sheets, honey in your hair, and whipped cream all over does not sound like fun (and in some cases, it just sounds painful).

Tool: Extra-Virgin Coconut Oil

Advice: "Extra virgin coconut oil is a miracle food: It's great as a cooking oil and as a healthy [lubricant] during sex. It also takes on other flavors, so you can mix it with other natural ingredients to create a [lubricant] you won't mind getting in your mouth."

Problem: Nothing edible should go up your nether regions. Sorry. Same goes for sweet mix-ins, like cocoa. Even Cosmo admits that "tasty treats can be erotic, but putting sugary edibles down south can lead to a vaginal infection."

Tool: Pepper

Advice: "Sprinkle a little pepper under his nose right before he climaxes. Sneezing can feel similar to an orgasm and amplify the feel-good effects."

Problem:
"Sorry, hold on for a second while I grab this pepper mill and try to stuff some under your nose." Conversely, Justin Timberlake in Friends with Benefits proved the sneeze theory right, so, whatever floats your boat.

Tool: Donut

Advice: "Slip a donut around his [you-know-what], and slowly eat it off."

Problem: First of all, what? Why? Just save the donut for breakfast with coffee. Second of all, isn’t that a little belittling?


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.


Inflammatory Foods: 9 Of The Worst Picks For Inflammation

While it doesn't exactly make you feel warm and fuzzy, inflammation is the body's totally healthy response to injury and infection, a way of defending ourselves by sending immune cells and key nutrients to the areas that need them most.

How do those fighter cells get there? Via increased blood flow, which in turn creates the redness, warmth, swelling and pain you likely associate with the word "inflammation." Say you cut your finger, and notice it turns a little red. "That's inflammation," says Dee Sandquist, RD, CDE, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson. "It helps to heal your finger."

But a small red cut that heals over time is entirely different from a state of chronic inflammation. This can be quite dangerous, in fact. When inflammation as an immune response is never "shut off," so to speak, the constant production of immune cells can do permanent damage, leading to cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's, among other health concerns. "When we don't see the inflammation system switch off, we end up in a detrimental state," says Julie Daniluk R.H.N., author of Meals That Heal Inflammation.

The causes of chronic inflammation can vary person to person, but include being overweight, experiencing lots of stress and even breathing polluted air, Women's Health reported. Lifestyle choices, like smoking or lack of exercise, also play a role. "Sedentary lifestyle, lack of sleep -- we have these repetitive insults that increase longer-term inflammation," says Jessica Black, N.D., author of The Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Recipe Book.

The foods we choose to eat -- or not to eat -- can also affect inflammation. Getting your fair share of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and omega-3 fatty acids -- similar, yes, to the Mediterranean diet -- has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. "Diet can serve as a protective function," says Sandquist. "When our bodies are best nourished, we're able to heal quicker if we do cut our finger and maybe even prevent chronic inflammation." It's likely that no one food is to blame for causing inflammation, she says, but that your overall diet could contribute.

For now, anti-inflammatory diet guidelines are simply suggestions. More research is needed to truly understand the relationship between diet and inflammation and, in turn, disease, WebMD reported.

Still, there are some general ideas about what foods to avoid to keep inflammation and illness at bay. "There are foods that exaggerate inflammation because they themselves are irritants," says Daniluk. Here are some of the worst offenders you might want to avoid. Let us know what we forgot in the comments.